Printing»Gerisch Band

Gerisch Band

ANNOUNCEMENTS


Well Marching Band Season has begun and it's time to start working on Alumni Band 2011!
For all those interested in being apart of the Alumni Band this year:

Please contact me via - FB, email at
brian.jobin@searshc.com.

Rehearsals will most likely start in Mid November.

For sure we will be doing the Fight Song and Alma Mater. The other piece or two are up for debate right now. I have retired Celebration for now but if there is enough people that still want to do it then I will bring it back.

Also I will be continuing the tradition of asking the Senior Class to join us for one song as well which has yet to be decided.

There is a Facebook Group: Southgate Anderson Music Alumni Organization that I have started also that will have updates that people can look up.

Thanks


TOP


BAND HAND BOOK


 

 

 

Printable Version (PDF)

 HANDBOOK

*****************

 

 

2011-2012

Southgate Middle School

Band Handbook

Toby Kmet, Band Director

Gerisch and Davidson Middle Schools

Office: 246-2623 and 246-4628

e-mail: Kmett@sgate.k12.mi.us


 

Table of Contents

Welcome to the 2011-2012 season………………………………………………3

Musician’s Creed……………………………………………………………...…4

Daily Routine……………………………………………………………….……5

Guildelines for Excellence…………………………………………....………….6

Attendance..................................................................................................6

Excused Absences…………………………………………………..…………..6

Unexcused Absences………………………………………………………..….6

Concert Etiquette for Performers and Audience Members......................6

Required Equipment…………………………………………………...………..7

Flutes…………………………………………………………………..………..7

Oboes……………………………………………………………….……………7

Bassoons………………………………………………………………..……….7

Clarinets………………………………………………………..……………….7

Saxes……………………………………………………………….……………7

Valve Brass (Trumpets,Horns,Euphoniums,Tubas)……..………………..7

Percussion……………………………………………………..……………….7

Instrument Care and Repairs………………………………..………………….8

Facilities…………………………………………………….………………….9

Instrument Storage……………………………………..……………………..9

Use of Practice Rooms………………………….……………………………9

Band Office……………………………………………………………………9

Performance Attire…………………………………………………………….9

Grading Policies…………………………………………………..….……….10

Practice………………………………………………………….……………10

Private Lessons……………………………………………………...………..11

Special Information for Parents…………………………………..…………..11

Communication………………………………………………...………..…..11

Band Booster Organization……………………………...…………………11

School Owned Instruments…………………………………………....………12

Switching Instruments……………………………………………...…………12

Signature Page…………………………………………………...……………13
Southgate Middle School Bands

September 2010

 

Welcome to the 2011-2012 season of the Southgate Middle School Bands! My goal this year is to provide each one of you with a band experience that is so positive and so rewarding that you cannot imagine not participating in the band again next year!

 

This handbook provides information to ensure the continuing success of the Southgate Bands. It contains general information, guidelines for performance, and behavior. You will also be given a calendar of band activities. Attendance at all the performance dates and important rehearsals is mandatory. It is important that you share this information with your parents so that they can help you have a successful year too!

 

I sincerely hope that your experience in the bands here in the Southgate School District will be rewarding and exciting. Each one of you is important to the success of the entire group. Every one of us, students, directors, and parents are involved in the quest for excellence!

 

Sincerely,

Toby T. Kmet

Toby Kmet

Band Director

 

Musician’s Creed

 

I am a valued and cherished member of the ensemble because of the unique and special qualities that only I possess.

 

Each day I will choose to use my talents, abilities, and character qualities to enhance my own growth and to nurture the growth of my fellow classmates.

 

In every moment, I will choose to behave in a manner that is consistent with my character.

 

In every situation, I have the ability to choose my own response. My response will either conform or contradict the internal set of values, which governs my life.

 

I have the power to create my own environment by the choices I make in each moment. I am not a victim of anyone or anything. I do exactly what I want to do; no more, no less.


Daily Routine

Before School

  • Enter the band room in an orderly manner.
  • Put your music and instrument in the assigned storage place.
  • Please limit your time in the band room, be careful not to disturb private lessons or classes that may be in progress.
  • Students who are not in band are not allowed in the band area.

 

After School

 

  • Pick up your instrument and music immediately after school.
  • Please be careful not to disrupt a private lesson taking place at this time.
  • Make arrangements in advance for transportation after rehearsals, sectionals, or lessons scheduled after school.

 

Class

 

The bulk of our performance work is conducted during regular band class. Rehearsal time is valuable and every moment must be used for instruction and performance preparation. If you delay the rehearsal by one minute, then you have wasted one minute of time of every member of the group.

 

  • Enter quietly and in a frame of mind for a productive rehearsal.
  • Check the board for the day’s special instructions and rehearsal agenda
  • Get all necessary equipment (instrument, reeds, music, pencil, valve oil, etc.) and be seated.
  • Be in the band room when the class is scheduled to begin and in your seat shortly afterward
  • If your instrument is in the shop for repairs, bring a note from home.
  • If you aren’t feeling well and can’t play your instrument, you are still expected to participate by "fingering through” you music.
  • Every member should be quiet when the director is teaching the class. No talking is permitted during this time. Raise your hand if you have a question. Avoid any activity which distracts other students or in any way disrupts rehearsal.
  • Have a productive rehearsal. Always give %100.
  • Play your instrument only when asked to by a director.
  • After rehearsal, put equipment in its proper place.

 

 

 

Guidelines for Excellence

Attendance: All students are required to attend all rehearsals and all performances. One of the primary purposes of the band is to prepare for and participate in public performances. A calendar of all activites is provided early in the school year so that there is adequate time to plan schedules and resolve conflicts.

 

Excused Absenses: The only acceptable excuses for absences are personal illness, a death in the family, a religious holiday, and serious extenuating circumstances approved by the director. From time to time there may be conflicting school-sponsored activities. In the event of a conflict, contact the sponsors involved so that we may help you. Come by and discuss the conflict beforehand, not afterward. It is the student’s responsibility to report the conflict.

 

Unexcused Absenses: Non-school-sponsored activities such as community league athletic teams, trips, parties, etc. do not constitute good reasons for missing rehearsals and performances. Please pan carefully. Doctor and dentist appointments should be scheduled so that they do not conflict with band events if at all possible.

 

Concert Etiquette for Performers and Audience Members:

· While in the audience, one should remain seated at all times. If you must leave, wait until there is a break between selections.

· While a group is performing, there should be no talking, moving around, or use of any electronic deices that would distract the student musicians on stage.

· At the end of each selection, it is proper to show appreciation to the performing group by applauding. Whistling, yelling, or the stomping of feet are not acceptable at band concerts.

· Some selections may have more than one part (or movement). It is not proper to applaud between each movement. Watch the conductor. When he/she drops his/her hands from the conduction position and steps off the podium, it is time for applause.


Required Equipment

 

6th Grade Band: Woodwind and brass students should have the Essential Elements 2000, book 1 and a three ring band binder in addition to their instrument. It is also strongly recommender that each student own a pocket metronome, music stand, and a small mirror for home practice.

 

  • Flutes- Cleaning rod, swab stick, clean cloth
  • Oboes- A minimum of three good reeds at all times, silk cleaning swab, cork grease, cleaning cloth. A reed case is a good idea to protect your reeds

 

  • Bassoons- A minimum of three good reeds at all times, silk cleaning swab, cork grease, cleaning cloth. A reed case is a good idea to protect your reeds

 

  • Clarinets- A minimum of four good reeds, mouthpiece brush, swab, cork grease, cleaning cloth. A reed case is a good idea to protect your reeds.

 

  • Saxes- A minimum of four good reeds, mouthpiece brush, swab, cork grease, cleaning cloth. A reed case is a good idea to protect your reeds.

 

  • Valved Brasses (Trumpets, Horns, Euphoniums, Tubas)- Valve oil, tuning slide grease, mouthpiece brush, cleaning snake, cleaning cloth.

 

  • Trombones- Spray water bottle, slide cream, tuning slide grease, mouthpiece brush, cleaning rod, clean cloth.

 

  • Percussion- One pair of snare sticks (5A), one pair of timpani mallets, one pair of yarn mallets (rattan or plastic handled, cord or yarn wrapped), one pair of plastic bell mallets, and a stick bag. Keep all of your sticks in your stick band and label all of your equipment with a permanent marker.

 

 

7th and 8th Grade Bands:

· All equipment/items listed above for your instrument.

· Essential Elements 2000, Book 2 for your instrument.

· A three ring band binder

· At least one pencil- not a pen, marker, highlighter, etc. at all band rehearsals.

· Instruments and individual copies of all music are needed for every class, section rehearsal, and performance.

Instrument Care and Repairs

 

The student is expected to keep his or her instrument clean and in good repair at all times and to follow the instrument care procedures he or she has been taught. If a student has a problem with an instrument, check it out with the director before taking it to the shop. Many times the director can make minor repairs and save the student and parent time and money. You may take your instrument to any of the local repair shops. Our middle schools deal regularly with Marshall’s Music, A and R music, and Mike Carrey Music.

 

Each student must have his or her name, address, and phone number labeled on his/her instrument case. Percussion students must have their name on all equipment including sticks and mallets.

 

Woodwinds

· Keep instrument free of dust.

· Check pads weekly for worn or torn skins.

· Wooden instruments should be bore oiled twice a year to prevent cracking.

· Mouthpieces should be cleaned once a week.

· Cases should be kept clean. Students should vacuum out their cases every six weeks in order to keep free from excess dust. Do not keep music or pencils in your case unless there are specific compartments for them.

Brass

· Instruments should be washed, inside and out, with dish soap and luke warm water once every six weeks.

· Mouthpieces should be cleaned once a week.

· Tuning slides should be cleaned and greased once every six weeks.

· Trombone slides should be cleaned and creamed once every two weeks.

· Valves should be kept well oiled.

· Cases should be kept clean. Students should vacuum out their cases every six weeks in order to keep free from excess dust. Do not keep music or pencils in your case unless there are specific compartments for them

 

Percussion

  • Please refer to required equipment.
  • All percussionists are responsible for keeping all equipment, including school equipment, clean and in good working order.
  • Cover school equipment after each rehearsal or performance.

 

If any repair work is needed on a school-owned instrument due to negligence or abuse, the school expects the student or parents to pay for such repair.


Facilities

 

Instrument Storage: Most students with small instruments, such as flutes and clarinets keep their instruments in their regular school locker. Students with larger instruments will be issued a storage locker in the band room and will need to provide a combination lock for that locker. Please no key locks. The combination must be given to the band director for the event that a student forget his or her combination. Only instruments may be stored in these lockers, no clothes, food, or other school supplies are to be stored here. Books and other necessary school supplies may be left in the band lockers only during the class period in which the student attends band. Special arrangements can be made for students participating in after school activities or athletics.

 

The band room at Gerisch will be open ten minutes before school starts for instruments to be put away, and it will be open at the end of the day for a short time for them to be picked up.

 

Use of Practice Rooms: Practice Rooms are available for the follwing:

  • For private instruction with a private teacher or director.
  • For individual practice. There should never be more than one person in a practice room without special permission from the director.
  • Gum, food, drinks, etc, are not allowed in any part of the band area.

 

Band Office: The band office is strictly off limits to band students without permission from a band director.

 

Performance Attire

 

Unity is a musical goal for the band as an artistic ensemble, a concept that students must convey during public performances. There is respect for individuality in the Southgate bands, and it is your right to express yourself in appearance during rehearsals. However, you are a member of a team while in concert. Students are expected to be in full dress wearing all uniform parts correctly at all events. Improper attire will result in the student no being allowed to perform. The uniform must be in good order when the student arrives for a concert; shirt and pants are pressed, no excessive jewelry, or other distracting garments.

 

Ladies: Black dress pants (no skirts or jeans), black hose, black shoes (no athletic shoes), white Gerisch band polo shirt (tucked in).

Gentlemen: Black dress pants (no jeans), black belt, black socks, black shoes (no athletic shoes), white Gerisch band polo shirt (tucked in).

 

Students are financially responsible for supplying all parts of the uniform. If there is difficulty in supplying all or part of the uniform, please contact Mr. Kmet.


Grading Policies

 

A student’s grade will be based on the following criteria:

 

1) 40% on Participation and Preparedness - This grade is an assessment of how well a band student participates in class activities. Things that can have an impact on this grade are a student’s behavior (if they are removed from class they can not participate), a student’s preparedness (they need their instruments and supplies in order to participate), and a student’s effort. No student will fail this class if they are trying everyday to improve as a musician.

 

2) 30% on Tests and Quizzes - We will have a few playing tests each marking period and occasionally a written quiz. The students will usually know about these a few days in advance and they should practice the appropriate material.

 

3) 30% on Homework - This grade is based on student compositions, in class dictation, and various other homework assignments. Students will also be asked to keep a practice record. Band students should practice regularly at home and the log allows me to give them grade credit for their efforts.

TOP



SWITCHING INSTRUMENTS INFO


Switching Instrument Information

 

In order for us to have a great band, it is often necessary for a student to switch instruments.  In the second year of band we start to incorporate more instruments and we start to improve the instrumentation of the group.  In class I have spoken with the students about switching instruments.  Here is some information that can help you and your student decide if switching is right for him or her.

 

1.     Switching can be a tough task.  So it is important that it is given consideration by the student, parent, and band director. All factors need to be considered, including what can help the band as whole, and what can help the student as a musician.

2.     Instruments that we often switch students to include Tuba, Baritone, Tenor sax, French Horn, Baritone Saxophone, Bass Clarinet and occasionally percussion.

3.  We only need a limited number of these instruments, so I usually will           audition students in the event that we have more players than we have positions.

4. Under most circumstances, a school instrument is provided for switch over students who are playing an instrument approved by the band director. It may be necessary to purchase different reeds for a reed switch over.

 

Who makes a good switcher?

 

1.     Students from larger sections, such as clarinets, flutes, and alto saxophones, often make good switchers.

2.     Students who have a strong sense of "stick-to-it-ivness” are good candidates for a switch. If your student tends to "waffle” about things, switching may not be the best option for him or her.

3.     Students who are good students academically are usually good switchers.

4.     Students who are able to stay after school for some extra help are usually good switch candidates.



Parental Guidelines for Effective Practice


Parental Guidelines for Effective Practicing

PLEASE PRINT AND POST THIS AT HOME!

 

 

Time Schedule – 15 to 25 minutes per day is the amount of practice time recommended for the average student. Practicing at the same time every day is good, but some flexibility should be built into this schedule. Don't bring the world to a halt at 6:30 every evening because it's practice time. Kids need time for fun and relaxation just as adults do. If the situation merits, reschedule the practice session to an earlier or later time.

 

Climate - Practicing should be done in an area that is free of distractions away from the TV, radio, stereo, telephone, and family traffic. Good lighting, a straight-backed chair, a mirror, and a music stand are definite assets. Reed players should have several good reeds available.

 

Encouraging your child - Spend some time listening to your child practice. Offer constructive criticisms, but choose your words carefully.

 

Is your child progressing? - The field of instrumental music is new for your child. Your student is learning to use his or her facial muscles in a different way, and breathing apparatus (lungs) for a different purpose. There is a new language of symbols (notes) that require the use of mind and body to translate into musical sounds. All this takes time! Even parents who have had band experience have probably forgotten the struggle of producing those first few notes. Parents can evaluate practice sessions by asking:

 

  • Am I hearing attempts at new material (such as higher notes, new rhythms, new exercises) or am I hearing the same old tune daily? (If you only hear selections your child can already play, then the practice time is not being used efficiently. A student will not improve if he/she plays the same thing over and over.)
  • Is the tone quality becoming more characteristic of the instrument or is the tone harsh, unmusical, or unpleasant?
  • Does the familiar tune or exercise move along steadily with some sort of fluent rhythm, or is it halting and jerky with no rhythm?
  • If you reach the point when your evaluation is consistently coming up negative, please call the band director. The student may be doing fine for his/her grade level; he/she may have hit a temporary plateau; or he/she may be having difficulty in grasping a basic concept that could bring his/her progress to a halt. This last problem may take a joint parent-teacher effort to be corrected.

 

Purchase a metronome - A metronome is a device that can be set to make a clicking sound at different rates of speed used to set the tempo for playing a musical piece. For example, if you set the metronome to 60, you will hear 60 clicks (beats) in every minute. If you set the metronome to 120, you will hear 120 clicks (beats) in every minute. So a setting of 120 is twice as fast as a setting of 60. The higher the number; the faster the tempo. Essentially, a metronome helps the musician keep a steady beat. It's like having your band director in a box clapping the tempo for you! After more and more practice sessions with the metronome, the student will know when you are right on the beat of the metronome because they will get the sensation of not hearing the metronome while they play! Essentially, their notes are replacing the metronome beats. This will happen but requires much patience/practice to achieve.

 

Go to www.metronomeonline.com for a FREE online metronome to use with every practice session!



Student Guidelines for Effective Practice


Student Guidelines for Effective Practicing

PLEASE PRINT AND  POST THIS AT HOME!

 

 

To learn a musical instrument you must learn to master many physical skills. The mastery of physical skills requires a real "physical education." As a music student, your job is to improve, master, and remember what you've accomplished. And, as much as possible, try to relax and enjoy the process. Most students fail in one of two basic ways:

 

  1. They practice in a way that fails to produce improvement.
  2. Although they practice carefully and produce improvements, but they fail to practice in a way that ensures a lasting memory of what they've learned.

 

The following are some tips and music study skills that will help you improve:

  • Warm up carefully. (This is the most important part of practicing, yet it is the part that is skipped the most by students.)
  • Select a time of day that is free from interruptions and use this time each day.
  • Choose a place to practice that is free from distractions.
  • Set a goal for the session: a scale; an exercise; specific sections of a piece; or even a measure that's giving you trouble. It may be a rhythm, the notes, or the tempo. Work on it slowly, and then build up your speed gradually. Before leaving it, put it together with the rest of the line. Don't try to do too much at one sitting.
  • Repetition of a problem area reinforces muscle memory.
  • VERY IMPORTANT: Use a metronome. (see below)
  • Rest when you get tired.

 

How do I know if I have completed a "QUALITY” practice session?

 

Use this table as a guide to your practice sessions. Each "QUALITY” practice session should have three parts:

Warm Up, New Music, and Music You Like!

 

 

Material Practiced

Minutes

Goal

Stuff I warm up with in class…

Long tones; easy drills; breathing exercises

 

 

2 to 5

Warm-up of embouchure (lip & mouth position) and instrument; good tone production

 

Stuff I don’t know…

New material; individual improvement; assignments; look ahead

 

 

5 to 10

Develop new exercises; increase range; new songs; new lessons in book

 

Stuff I know and LIKE…

Familiar exercises and etudes

 

 

5 to 10

Improvement of finger dexterity; tonguing; and overall fluency while playing music you enjoy!

 

 

A metronome is a device that can be set to make a clicking sound at different rates of speed used to set the tempo for playing a musical piece. For example, if you set the metronome to 60, you will hear 60 clicks (beats) in every minute. If you set the metronome to 120, you will hear 120 clicks (beats) in every minute. So a setting of 120 is twice as fast as a setting of 60. The higher the number, the faster the tempo. Essentially, a metronome helps the musician keep a steady beat. It's like having your band director in a box clapping the tempo for you! After more and more practice sessions with the metronome, you will know when you are right on the beat of the metronome because you will get the sensation of not hearing the metronome while you play! Essentially, your notes are replacing the metronome beats. This will happen but requires much patience/practice to achieve. Go to www.metronomeonline.com for a FREE online metronome to use with every practice session!



Practice Record for Tri 1


 STUDENT PRACTICE RECORD

Expectations

  1. Begin practicing on Wed. October 12 (First four sessions are due October 19).
  2. Practice for four practice sessions per week
                    No time limit! Each session may be as long or short as you wish.
                    Each session should have the following parts:
                                    Part 1 – Warm up
                                    Part 2 – Unfamiliar music
    (Includes new music and music you still need to improve on)
                                    Part 3 – Music that you know and like
  3. You may only practice up to two sessions per day (No credit will be given for more than two sessions per day)
  4. Parents: Indicate how many practice sessions your child has completed each day. Help your student total the sessions, and sign the record on Tuesday evening. Grades will be collected every Wednesday in class.

 

What if I forget my practice record on the day it’s due? Bring your completed practice record to Mrs. Garvey as soon as you remember. This should be done before class, after class, or after school.

 

While it is satisfactory to complete all your practice sessions over the weekend, it is best to spread your practice out over the week (just as you would for a sports team). Set aside a certain time and place in your house that is just for practicing. Have fun!

 

PRINTABLE PRACTICE RECORD (PDF) TRI 1

VIEWABLE PRACTICE RECORD (without download)